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Dog Nutritional Requirements Percentages

Dogs need various nutrients to live including amino acids from proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins. The percentage of each nutrient dogs need in their diet depends on their life stage (growth, reproduction, adult maintenance, or seniority).

Puppies need a higher percentage of protein to support growth, while adult dogs require less. Puppies have higher caloric and protein needs than adult dogs. Fat is an important source of energy for all dogs, but the amount needed varies based on activity level. Dogs at different life

While there are general recommendations for how much of each nutrient a dog needs relative to their weight, your dog’s specific requirements may vary based on their age, activity level, and health condition.

When in doubt, always consult with your veterinarian to determine the best diet for your pup. They will be able to recommend a food that meets your dog’s specific nutritional needs.

The percentages below are general recommendations for healthy, adult dogs.

Protein: 18-22.5%

According to AAFCO’s revised recommendation, protein should contain 18 to 22.5% on a dry matter basis (DM) reflecting the minimum and maximum nutrient concentrations for any particular recipe.

There are many different types of proteins that can be found in pet foods including animal-based proteins such as beef, chicken, turkey, lamb, fish, and eggs as well as plant-based proteins like soybean meal and corn gluten meal.

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It’s important to note that not all proteins are created equal. Animal-based proteins tend to be more complete, meaning they contain all of the essential amino acids your dog needs.

Plant-based proteins are usually incomplete, meaning they lack one or more of the essential amino acids. That’s why it’s important to choose a food that contains both animal and plant-based proteins to ensure your dog is getting all of the nutrients they need.

Diet proteins contain 10 essential amino acids and most protein by-products may not have all the amino acids and it is important to understand where protein is sourced from for any particular kibble you want to get.

Fat: 5.5-8.5%

Fats are an important source of energy for dogs, but the amount of fat needed in the diet varies based on activity level.

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) recommends that fat make up 5.5% to 8.5% of a dog’s diet on a DM basis.

Fat is also a good source of essential fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6, which are important for skin and coat health as well as joint function.

When choosing a food for your dog, make sure to look for one that contains a balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-3 is essential for heart health, while omega-6 is important for skin and coat health.

Carbohydrates: Up to 50%

Carbohydrates are an important source of energy for dogs, but the number of carbohydrates needed in the diet varies based on activity level.

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) recommends that carbohydrates make up 50% of a dog’s diet on a DM basis.

There are many different types of carbohydrates that can be found in pet foods including simple carbohydrates like sugar and complex carbohydrates like starchy vegetables, grains, and legumes.

Some dogs may be more sensitive to certain types of carbohydrates than others. For example, dogs with diabetes may need a food that contains complex carbohydrates like starchy vegetables and grains rather than simple carbohydrates like sugar.

If you’re unsure about which type of carbohydrate is best for your dog, always consult with your veterinarian. They will be able to recommend a food that meets your dog’s specific nutritional needs.

Fiber: 2.5-4%

Dietary fiber is an important part of a dog’s diet, but the amount of fiber needed varies based on activity level.

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) recommends that fiber make up 2.5 to 4% of a dog’s diet on a DM basis.

There are two types of fiber that can be found in pet foods: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and helps to slow down digestion, while insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and helps to promote regularity.

Both types of fiber are important for a healthy digestive system. If your dog is having trouble with their digestion, always consult with your veterinarian. They will be able to recommend a food that contains the right amount of fiber for your dog’s needs.

Vitamins and Minerals: Varies

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that help to keep your dog healthy. The amount of each vitamin and mineral needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Some vitamins and minerals are more important than others. For example, calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, while vitamin A is important for vision and immune function.

Phosporus : 0.4-1.0%

Phosphorus is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s bones and teeth healthy. The amount of phosphorus needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Potassium:0.6%

Potassium is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s muscles and nerves healthy. The amount of potassium needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Sodium: 0.3%

Sodium is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s body fluids

Chloride: 0.4%

Chloride is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s body fluids balanced. The amount of chloride needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Magnesium: 0.05%

Magnesium is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s muscles and nerves healthy. The amount of magnesium needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Iron: 40-88 mg/kg

Iron is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s blood cells healthy. The amount of iron needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for iron is 88 mg/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of iron may be at risk for iron toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.

Copper: 7.3-12.4 mg/kg

Copper is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s blood cells healthy. The amount of copper needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for copper is 12.4 mg/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of copper may be at risk for copper toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.

Manganese: 5-7.2 mg/kg

Manganese is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s bones and teeth healthy. The amount of manganese needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Zinc: 80-100 mg/kg

Zinc is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s immune system healthy. The amount of zinc needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for zinc is 100 mg/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of zinc may be at risk for zinc toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.

Iodine: 1 mg/kg

Iodine is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s thyroid gland healthy. The amount of iodine needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

Selenium: 0.35 mg/kg

Selenium is an essential mineral that helps to keep your dog’s immune system healthy. The amount of selenium needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for selenium is 0.35 mg/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of selenium may be at risk for selenium toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.

Vitamin A: 500-2000 IU/kg

Vitamin A is an essential vitamin that helps to keep your dog’s vision and immune system healthy. The amount of vitamin A needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for vitamin A is 2000 IU/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of vitamin A may be at risk for vitamin A toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.

Vitamins

Vitamin D: 5-10 IU/kg

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin that helps to keep your dog’s bones and teeth healthy. The amount of vitamin D needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for vitamin D is 10 IU/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of vitamin D may be at risk for vitamin D toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.

Vitamin E: 15-30 IU/kg

Vitamin E is an essential vitamin that helps to keep your dog’s immune system healthy. The amount of vitamin E needed in the diet varies based on a number of factors including age, activity level, and health status.

The safe upper limit for vitamin E is 30 IU/kg. Dogs who consume more than this amount of vitamin E may be at risk for vitamin E toxicity, which can lead to serious health problems.