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Dog Calcium Requirements & Doses

Calcium is one of the essential minerals that your dog needs for good health. It is required for strong bones and teeth, proper muscle function, and normal blood clotting. A lack of calcium can lead to health problems such as bone loss, muscle weakness, and difficulty clotting.

Puppies need extra calcium during their first few months of life to help them grow strong bones and teeth. Adult dogs need calcium to maintain their bone health and to prevent problems such as muscle weakness and difficulty clotting.

3 Ways to give Calcium to your dog

There are a few different ways to give your dog calcium. You can give them supplements, feed them foods that are high in calcium, or give them raw bones that they can gnaw on.

Giving your dog calcium supplements is a good way to make sure they are getting enough of this essential mineral. You can find calcium supplements at most pet stores. When choosing a supplement, make sure it is specifically for dogs and that it contains calcium carbonate or phosphate. Carbonates and phosphate are more easily absorbed by dogs than other forms of calcium.

You can also give your dog calcium by feeding them foods that are high in this mineral. Some good options include cottage cheese, yogurt, spinach, and kale. You can also give them raw bones to gnaw on, which will help satisfy their natural craving for chewing while also providing them with calcium.

It is important to talk to your veterinarian before giving your dog any supplements, as too much calcium can be harmful. They can help you determine the right amount of calcium for your dog based on their age, weight, and health condition.

AAFCO Nutrition Recommendation for Calcium and Sources:

AAFCO’s 2014 pet food guidelines have the following recommendation for calcium content in any dog food kibble.


Nutrient (% or per kg of diet)


Growth and Reproduction Minimum


Adult Maintenance Minimum


Adult Maintenance Maximum


Calcium (%)

1%0.6%2.5%

You can also use this guide where I got the 4 tables below;

How Dog Calcium Supplements are made

Most calcium supplements for dogs are made from calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate. These minerals are found in rocks and bones, and they can also be derived from eggshells.

Calcium carbonate is the most popular form of calcium supplement for dogs. It is inexpensive and easy to find. It is also very absorbable, so your dog’s body can make use of it easily.

Calcium phosphate is another popular form of calcium supplement for dogs. It is a little more expensive than calcium carbonate, but it is also more absorbable. This means that your dog’s body can make use of it more effectively.

Calcium carbonate for dogs dosage

The recommended dosage of calcium carbonate for dogs is 1 gram per 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of body weight daily. For example, a 50-pound (23 kg) dog would need 5 grams of calcium carbonate per day.

  • Give 1250 mg to 2g of calcium carbonate to a small-breed dog
  • Give 2 grams to 4g of calcium carbonate to a medium-breed dog
  • Give 4 grams to 6g of calcium carbonate to a large-breed dog
  • Give 6 grams to 10g of calcium carbonate to giant-breed dog

calcium phosphate for dogs dosage

The recommended dosage of calcium phosphate for dogs is 0.5 grams per 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of body weight daily. For example, a 50-pound (23 kg) dog would need 2.5 grams of calcium phosphate per day.

When to Give Puppies Calcium

Puppies need extra calcium during their first few months of life to help them grow strong bones and teeth. You can start giving them calcium supplements at 4 weeks old. Puppies typically need 2-3 times the amount of calcium as adult dogs.

Giving puppies calcium is important, but you should also make sure they are getting enough other essential nutrients such as protein, fat, and vitamins. A good way to make sure your puppy is getting all the nutrients they need is to feed them high-quality puppy food. Puppy food is formulated to provide puppies with the right balance of nutrients for their growing bodies.

Benefits of Calcium for Dogs

Calcium is essential for dogs of all ages, but it is especially important for puppies, senior dogs, and breeds that are prone to joint problems.

Calcium helps build strong bones and teeth. It also helps muscles contract and nerves transmit signals. Calcium is also necessary for blood clotting.

Dogs that don’t get enough calcium can develop a condition called hypocalcemia, which can lead to muscle spasms, weakness, and seizures.

Calcium for Dogs After Giving Birth

After giving birth, dogs need extra calcium to help their bodies recover and to produce milk for their puppies. You can supplement your dog’s diet with calcium carbonate or phosphate during this time.

It is also important to make sure that your dog is getting enough other nutrients such as protein, fat, and vitamins. A good way to do this is to feed them high-quality dog food that is formulated for dogs who are nursing. Nursing dog food has the right balance of nutrients to help support your dog’s body during this time.

Giving your dog the right amount of calcium is essential for their health. Calcium supplements can help make sure your dog is getting the calcium they need. Talk to your veterinarian about whether or not calcium supplements are right for your dog. They can help you determine the right dosage and type of supplement for your dog based on their age, weight, and health condition.

Dosage of tums for dogs

As an antacid, the tums dose that is most often used in dogs is 0.5 grams and up to 5 grams total dose orally every 4 hours as needed. This would be 1/4 of a regular strength tablet and up to 1 full regular strength tablet for a 50 lb dog. For dogs that weigh less, use fewer tums. If your dog weighs more than 50 lbs, you can give them up to 2 regular-strength tablets every 4 hours as needed.

Calcium carbonate dogs renal failure

Dogs with Chronic kidney issues such as renal failure can benefit from dietary supplements containing calcium carbonate, calcium-lactate gluconate, chitosan and sodium bicarbonate.  calcium-lactate gluconate are more easily absorbed than calcium carbonate, but all of these forms of calcium can be used to increase dietary intake in dogs with chronic kidney issues. When using any form of calcium supplement, it is important to monitor serum calcium levels closely and adjust the dosage as needed to maintain normal serum calcium concentrations.

Dogs with chronic renal failure often have decreased appetite and may be reluctant to eat. Feeding foods or treats that are high in calcium can help increase your dog’s intake of this important nutrient.

Some commercially available dog foods and treats that are high in calcium include:

-Zignature Kangaroo Formula dry food

-Orijen Regional Red dry food

-Annamaet Lean dry food

-Fromm Four-Star Nutritionals Trout and Salmon A la Veg dry food

-Wellness CORE Original Formula dry food

Nulo Freestyle Trout and Sweet Potato recipe dry food

Nutro Ultra Small Breed Adult Chicken, Lamb & Salmon Meal dry food

-Merrick Classic Small Breed Grain Free dry food

-Blue Buffalo Wilderness Duck Recipe dry food

-Canidae Pure Elements Lamb and Potato recipe dry food

-Solid Gold Wee Bit with Real Beef, Oatmeal & Peas dry food

-Taste of the Wild High Prairie Puppy Formula dry food

Chitosan is a dietary supplement that is derived from shrimp and crab shells. It is a source of insoluble dietary fiber that can bind to minerals, such as calcium, and help them be excreted in the stool. This can help decrease the amount of calcium that is absorbed into the body and may be helpful for dogs with chronic kidney disease who need to limit their calcium intake.

Sodium bicarbonate is another supplement that can help decrease the absorption of calcium in the gut. It can also help neutralize stomach acid and may be helpful for dogs who are taking medications that decrease stomach acid production, such as omeprazole (Prilosec). Sodium bicarbonate should be used with caution in dogs with heart or kidney disease and should be used only under the guidance of a veterinarian.

How much calcium is toxic to dogs

While calcium is an important nutrient for dogs, too much calcium can be toxic. Symptoms of calcium toxicity include vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, abdominal pain, and decreased appetite. If you think your dog has consumed too much calcium, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC)